Gcse Coursework Science Examples Of Physical Change

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Physical changes

This type of change means that no new substances are made, but there is a change in the appearance of a chemical. Examples of physical change include state changes and dissolving.

State changes

All substances can be solid, liquid or gas.

In this process, water (hydrogen oxide) has not been chemically changed, but by cooling or heating it, you can change its state.

Dissolving

Some chemicals can be dissolved in water, e.g. common salt (sodium chloride).

Sugar lumps dissolved in water make a sugar solution. Adding more sugar will make the solution more concentrated. If less sugar had been added, it would be a more dilute solution. Another way to dilute the solution would be to add more water (think of diluting orange!)

In a solution, the dissolving substance is called the solute [solute: A solute is the material that dissolves in a solvent to form a solution.] . The liquid used to dissolve the solute is called the solvent [solvent: A solvent is the liquid in which the solute dissolves to form a solution.] . For example, in the case of sugar and water, sugar is the solute, and water is the solvent.

Video: Changes of state

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